the worse company…

Of all the ‘evil corps’ out there, whose the worse?

… and the winner is

For the last decade my list of bad actors in the corporate world usually put Coca-Cola on top of the list with Monsanto and others way down.  Coke has the audacity in its long-term strategic mission to envision replacing water in 3rd world countries – not that they’ll ever admit to that. But the anecdotal evidence supports this: witness their exclusive FIFA (global soccer federation) youth league contracts in Africa and Asia where they supply free Coke samples to young kids that can barely get clean water in their villages.  And you thought Monsanto was the bad boy with their ‘let’s own all the seeds of the world’… well, water is WAY more critical than seeds… and Coke takes the Darwin award on that.

But stay tuned – there are a couple new bad actors out there that put Coke’s world domination of water supply to shame:  Nestle and Unilever. Both of these global behemoths control a massive network of smaller regional food companies. I am familiar with Nestle from a more local perspective with their water games in California and Oregon. If ever there was a poster child for underhanded and deceptive corporate shenanigans in trying to privatize and control mountain spring water that’s in the public domain – it’s Nestle.

Here’s what the junk food transition looks like in Brazil. There are now more obese than underweight adults in the world. Sales of ultra-processed foods have more than doubled over the last decade — even spreading into developing countries.

Nestle’s logo http://www.nestle.com says: ‘Good food, good life’ Yikes! If there’s anything that Nestle does NOT do – is sell good food.   Nestle and Unilever are doing what is common for large profit-obsessed corporations: increase profits by increasing market share. USA, Europe and China have wised up to the bad effects of junk food. So the only place to easily grow market share is in 3rd world countries: Africa, Asia, South America. And are they every successful in that effort!

A recent NYT article about obesity in Brazil highlights Nestle’s new approach to hooking people to their junk food for a lifetime of addiction, obesity and diabetes.

Food vendors have become the local mom and pop of the neighborhood. This is the new preferred way for the large corporations to infiltrate local hoods and hook people on their junk.  No need to have a store front. Like Avon and Tupperware parties, just get locals to sell the junk food under the guise of providing local jobs.

this kind of corporate double-speak makes me want to throw up. How can a new generation of executives (millenials?) come up with this?

Nestlé markets across Africa are today showing their commitment to young people with numerous programmes and initiatives in celebration of Africa Youth Day. Nestlé’s activities on the continent form part of the company’s global youth initiative, Nestlé needs YOUth, with an ambition to help 10 million young people get access to economic opportunities by 2030.”

This is nothing more than being a glorified drug dealer. Get a free sample, buy low-cost food right in front of your house, enjoy the sugar/fats/oil flavorings, get addicted to it… eat more… gain weight slowly, decrease exercise slowly… and before you know it you’re on the treadmill to diabetes, insulin, gangarhea and an early death. But not before becoming a burden on the health care system, on your family, and on society in general: so starts an epidemic.

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